Trams on Ngo Geng Kiu 電車渡河

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An interesting photo in 1920s commonly find in books showing two double-deck tramcars, one with canvas roof and the other one fully enclosed passed by the “bridge”, with a pair of tracks laid underneath.

Most Hong Kongers named it “Ngo Geng Kiu 鵝頸橋” (formerly named Bowrington Bridge, In Cantonese “Ngo Geng” means “gooseneck”) guestimating for its curved outline of the canal, now become a well-known area for “beating the petty person” 打小人 today 1.

The tracks underneath has been a mysterious query on readers and historicans, some argued it’s for trams running but obviously in weak persuation, as the height is not enough for trams even a single-decker. It’s part of the Praya East Reclamation Project, the tracks are for transporting sand and soil removed from Morrison Hill to the waterfront land reclamation.

這張相片在書中頗常見,兩架分別裝有帆布帳篷和密封式上蓋的雙層電車,橫渡鵝頸橋,橋下還隱藏了兩排路軌。

它是香港人熟悉的「鵝頸橋」(前稱寶靈頓橋),”Ngo Geng”廣東話的意思是鵝頸,橋下是一條運河,它彎曲窄長形如鵝頸,故橫跨此河的橋俗稱「鵝頸橋」。今天成為了著名「打小人」的集中地。

至於橋底的鐵軌用途為何,曾經掀起學者和歷史學家辯論的熱潮,有人堅稱是行走電車,但光看橋的高度不足以讓單層電車經過,欠卻說服力。其實它是當年東區填海工程的一部分,鐵軌用作將摩理臣山一帶的砂石泥土運送到填海區。

Coincidentally, tha above view shows a track layout being laid in the same area in 1922, which was the main way to Happy Valley and the junction of the depot exit in Russell Street.

巧合地,上面的照片顯示1922年該路段的確有電車路軌,當時電車由堅拿道東,經過羅素街車廠出口,進入跑馬地。

Notes:

1 The Best of Asia 2009 entitled in Time Magazine

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